An Hommage to Jane Little

 

In the midst of trying to balance “normal life” (that’s code for working a job) while booking a tour that has us playing some BIG SHOWS and recording a new record (should be out late summer/early fall,“Killing the Host”) that has us traveling deeper down the experimental rabbit hole,  I came across a story that reminded me that truly living your life is following your passion.   For Cyndy and I, living this fringe lifestyle can often be a

Chicky and I post show in Bremerton, WA.  Dope venue there called the Charleston.

Chicky and I post show in Bremerton, WA. Dope venue there called the Charleston.

daily exercise in disappointments, coupled with some extreme highs, and just when you think you can’t get any lower…you do.  Just when you think you’ll never get out of your rut.. you do.

Rehearsal hijinks!

Rehearsal hijinks!

The constant push pull struggle is at the core of our relationship with the musical path we’ve chosen.  This brings me back to the article I read earlier.  It was a story on NPR about a woman named Jane Little.  After a 71 year career playing double bass in the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Mrs. Little collapsed and died on stage. She died doing what she did best.  Playing with the orchestra.  71 years was a world record by the way…

When I saw the headline, the first thing I immediately thought of was Cyndy.  I thought of how much we can’t live without performing.

The PRF BBQ at Mosswood Park here in Oakland.  Thank you Conan Neutron for letting us be a part of it.

The PRF BBQ at Mosswood Park here in Oakland. Thank you Conan Neutron for letting us be a part of it.

I thought of how many shows we’ve played to only the bar staff and a couple people and how it  that feels when you look out from the stage onto an empty venue and you wonder to yourself “what’s it gonna take?” The “why me’s” start to set in.  Then, before self doubt can take hold of my soul I catch eyes across the stage to my talented, gorgeous wife. 2016-01-27 16.31.13

My partner in crime.  Not only do I get to play with this woman every night, every song you hear from us a group effort.  We craft every tune with the goal of trying to put a soundtrack to human condition. The passion we have for each other, for each song, we get to display that on stage, every night.  As vulnerable as that makes us, we love it because it brings us closer to the audience.  The songs, the performance of the songs connects to people on a level that has enabled us to increase our LFADM family to small towns, and big cities all over the globe. And that’s the way we choose to live.

The staff at the Charleston in Bremerton, WA

The staff at the Charleston in Bremerton, WA

We follow our dreams every day.  Jane Little, Cyndy and I didn’t know you, but we appreciate your dedication and we understand your devotion to performing your art.

 

See you guys sooner than later

Love,

LFADM

You know you're hardcore when you look this fierce in overalls.

You know you’re hardcore when you look this fierce in overalls.